Green horn Greenberg dumped by Boswell

Having spent a great deal of Friday lampooning the American heavyweight picture and particularly Cedric Boswell, the 39 year old recruited to provide a meaningful benchmark for Roman Greenberg’s soporific progress as a heavyweight. It is with some humility I report that the veteran heavyweight, despite age, and the lack of anything other than a TKO defeat to Jameel McCline in 2003 on his record, still proved too much for Greenberg. Stopping the supposed prospect late in the second.

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Gammer succumbs to Pianeta and broken hand

Welsh hard-man Scott Gammer was forced to retire from his absorbing contest with German based prospect, Francesco Pianeta, due to a suspected broken hand. An injury he must have sustained very earlier in the fight as he threw precious few during the 8 completed rounds. It was particularly hard on the returning former British Heavyweight champion, as he looked well placed following 3 or 4 rounds to get the job done. Pianeta looked pleased not to be forced to accrue any further damage to his right eye, left damaged by Gammer’s meaty left hook.

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Archive: Holyfield ignores the lessons of King Canute

August 23rd 2005

Three years on from the first publication of this article on thesweetscience.com, its hard to comprehend that the career of Evander Holyfield should still be an active topic. He had been consigned to the scrap heap innumerable times already by 2005 and yet still steadfastly refused to yield to the dieing of the light. At the time of release the first formal steps to forcible retire the proud warrior had been taken, they proved pointless and rightfully so.

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Boxing: Greenberg, Boswell and the old smoke and mirrors trick

To casual fans of the sport in polite conversation in the office or across the pool table I can appear to know everything about boxing. Of course I don’t, in fact I can barely scratch the surface if really pushed on fighters of the modern era or times gone by in comparison with true boxing historians. I just appear, in comparison to those for whom boxing is a by-gone curiosity or a console game, to be the Obi-Wan Kenobi of the noble art. I state this to alleviate the disappointment I felt on realising Cedric Boswell would not be the dangerous watershed for Roman Greenberg I presumed he would.

Continue reading “Boxing: Greenberg, Boswell and the old smoke and mirrors trick”

Guest: In Thailand, there is no PPV

There is no such thing as bad publicity, except your own obituary.”  Irish author Brendan Behan once wrote and despite his celtic roots suggesting a pre-disposition to the noble art, I’ve no idea where he stood on the great PPV debate. However, the announcement Amir Khan is to feature on the premium format has so enraged boxing’s keenest observers one wonders whether their collective outbursts has served only to further promote the show?. In the meantime, guest writer Oliver Fennell provides a stiff retort to Andrew Mullinder’s prose of yesterday from his new home in a far more humble Thailand.

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There is no such thing as a free punch; the PPV debate

Guest writer Andrew Mullinder comments on the furore surrounding the announcement Amir Khan’s next bout is to cost  SKY subscribers an additional £14.99 to watch, despite featuring an unknown Colombian and lacking the global significance typically found at the core of most pay-per view contests. An astonishing step, and one Frank Warren appeared aware, looks opportunisitic and premature. Mullinder however, has grown a little tired of the boxing fans’ bluster and bleating about PPV and while it doesn’t have the withering zing of Terry Dooley’s article this morning, Andrew makes an interesting point. Continue reading “There is no such thing as a free punch; the PPV debate”

Video of Amir Khan foe Breidis Prescott in action

I’ll not be indulging SKY next month, there is no hope what so ever of the satellite broadcaster’s flashy advertising campaigns convincing me that Amir Khan is a PPV attraction. Nor will I succumb to the overt and subliminal suggestion his opponent, Colombian Breidis Prescott, is a foe of such brilliance that to miss the PPV could mean I miss Khan being beaten. Continue reading “Video of Amir Khan foe Breidis Prescott in action”

Boxing: Rugged Simpkin joins Prizefighter

I first saw Luke Simpkin fight in 2001 against future British title challenger John McDermott in, if memory serves, the walk-out bout on the Danny Williams v Kali Meehan show at Bethnal Green. Dogged and willful the bearded brawler belied his tender years and gave a solid account of himself against the then unbeaten Essex man. Britishboxing.net report the Derbyshire trier has replaced Ian Millarvie in the second installment of the Prizefighter series next month. Continue reading “Boxing: Rugged Simpkin joins Prizefighter”

The Odd Couple: Oscar and Pacquaio meet Dec 6th

According to a number of reports this evening, tomorrow will bring the announcement Oscar De La Hoya is to spurn the physically bigger tests of Paul Williams, Sergio Mora and Antonio Margarito to face Filipino shark Manny Pacquiao on December 6th in his farewell fight. Mooted for several days, the clash had divided fans. The size disparity of the former Super-Flyweight (Pacquiao) and former Middleweight titlist (Oscar) bewilders cynics, but the strength of the potential PPV has proven too much to resist for both parties.

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Boxing: Acquiring a taste for Rocky Marciano

Rewind five years; amid the period of heavyweight history dominated by Lennox Lewis and Vitali Klitschko, with towering contenders like Jameel McCline, Wladimir Klitschko, Michael Grant, Henry Akinwande, Hasim Rahman, Nicolay Valuev and Andrew Golota and it was increasingly easy to dismiss the chances of bygone greats like Rocky Marciano and Gene Tunney, or even through to Joe Frazier, emerging victorious in any fantasy match-up. Continue reading “Boxing: Acquiring a taste for Rocky Marciano”

Golota v Briggs in Poland?

Polish boxing site, www.boxingnews.pl, is reporting colourful heavyweight veterans Andrew Golota and Shannon Briggs are set to clash in October on the under-card of Tomasz Adamek‘s next fight. My Polish is a little rusty, i.e. non-existent but that seems to be the thrust of the piece. Its an intriguing contest and while of only peripheral significance to the main heavyweight picture, Golota is never more than one knockout away from a world-title shot.

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Moore’s mythical shot becomes reality

Precious few fighters boast the universal respect afforded to blue-collar banger Jamie Moore. The Salford Light-Middleweight is one of British boxing’s most well-respected professionals and the news his challenge to Zaurbek Baysangurov for the European title at 154 pounds has finally been confirmed will be widely welcomed. Delayed by Moore’s career threatening shoulder injury and a late nose injury to the champion back in December, the fight began to sound like an urban legend – everyone talked about it, but nobody could prove it was real.

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Awkward as ever, Junior Witter speaks out

Defining Junior Witter’s style has stumped greater minds than mine. Unorthodox is the ubiquitous descriptive and through generic, probably the most accurate. The former WBC Light-Welterweight champion is almost impossible to pigeon-hole, once the slippery, pitter-patter runner he blossomed into a destructive two fisted puncher but threw in enough disjointed performances to never fully engage the Yorkshire public or television audiences. Now as a former, rather than current World champion the one thing he is, without fear of contradiction, is avoidable. Continue reading “Awkward as ever, Junior Witter speaks out”

Venerable Manuel Medina fights on

For all the criticism I aim at the likes of Bernard Hopkins, Roy Jones and Evander Holyfield for their unwillingness to accept the passing of time and talent and for all the disappointment I feel hearing Marco Antonio Barrera and Chris Byrd are set to return to action it conversely provides great comfort to learn plucky veteran Manuel Medina is still performing close to his best well into his thirties. James Toney and Vitali Klitschko may garner more attention but neither has contested the number of world-titles the 37 year old Mexican has.

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Valuev v Ruiz II; Impossible to miss

It may seem condescending or ungracious to suggest Nicolay Valuev is a hard fighter to ignore, or perhaps overlook. At 7ft and over 300lbs the Russian is a man of almost mythical proportions but even though his contest with America’s John Ruiz is very unlikely to induce high-blood pressure moments, I will find the broadcast impossible to ignore. Continue reading “Valuev v Ruiz II; Impossible to miss”

Chunky Gold Medina; Degale to go pro?

James Degale’s success in the Beijing Olympics has left the young Londoner with a difficult decision to make about his fistic future. Capitalise on his gold medal and accept one of the presumably numerous offers from promoters trying to tempt him into the professional sport, or hold on until 2012 to try and repeat the triumph in his hometown. Continue reading “Chunky Gold Medina; Degale to go pro?”

I’ve tried, Oscar, but Paul Williams doesn’t excite me

Much though there is to admire in Oscar De LaHoya’s glistening career and despite the perfect role model he represents for any aspiring pugilist his status as boxing’s Golden Boy, and the enormous cheques his crossover appeal allows him to accept and write, is beginning to leave me a little nauseous. Oscar isn’t the Light-Middleweight champion, nor is he a Welterweight titleist – you need to go back to 2002-2003 for the last time he won and defended a belt – and yet he remains the ultimate goal of every fighter from 130 to 160 pounds. With this financial luster comes responsibility. One he will ignore if he opts for Paul Williams.

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Klitschko persistence; Peter in October

Vitali Klitschko, 37, was never a great fighter. He certainly wasn’t a great heavyweight champion. In fact, I’d go further I’d say he was a poor heavyweight champion and little more than a mediocre fighter. Like many in the curious, contrary world of boxing his repute grew more in gritty defeat to an ageing Lennox Lewis than in any of his victories, of which I would struggle to summon a single performance of historic significance.

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Price dumped out of Olympics

Big David Price, all 6ft 8 of him, took two standing 8 counts and failed to score in his semi final contest with Italian Roberto Cammarelle. Price appeared to land more than one scoring shot but without the clarity for the five ringside observers to press their blue buttons together. Bronze remains a solid achievement for the giant Brit but for once aggression and combination punching prevailed. The Italian, the betting favourite according to the BBC’s Jim Neilly, was the more aggressive, positive fighter from the first bell.

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Boxing: Usain Bolt, Muhammad Ali and the impossible comparison

The astonishing performances of Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt broke the consciousness of almost the entire population of the world this week. Only the Olympics and perhaps the football World Cup offer such global exposure [alas the heavyweight championship has long lost this broad appeal], and though I doubt he could run backwards as fast as his contemporaries in the Olympic boxing ring, the question of his place amongst the greats of the track is unquestionable. The clock doesn’t lie. Bolt is faster than anyone who ever lived. Such cross generation comparison in boxing, provides no such clarity.

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Guest Article: A score needs settling in the Olympic ring

Guest writer Andrew Mullinder gets hot under the collar about the peculiarities and weaknesses of scoring in Amateur boxing, suggesting the quest to eradicate the blatant favouritism displayed in Seoul 88 has actually diluted the sport to such an extent it has become little more than a be-gloved version of fencing. As always, Andrew thinks its time somebody did something about it.

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Guest Article: Mayweather’s retirement a pretty pass


Guest writer Andrew Mullinder muses on Floyd Mayweather’s potentially misleading pristine professional record and the less public statistics that strongly suggest he truly is the once in a lifetime fighter he proclaims to be. Either way, Andrew suggests, his recent retirement is both frustrating and deserved.

Continue reading “Guest Article: Mayweather’s retirement a pretty pass”

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