Estrada edges Gonzales in a pulsating encounter as boxing remembers a fallen great

Greatness, true greatness, borne of excellence and deployed over an extended period, is not a prize many fighters acquire. The term is liberally used. An affectation encouraged by a culture of over-promotion and the superficiality of the social media age. Perception, however unsubstantiated it may prove, is always king.

Last night, as two of the modern era’s greatest, Juan Francisco Estrada and Roman Gonzales, waited to provide another example of their outstanding talent and devotion to the craft, the news Marvellous Marvin Hagler, the former Middleweight champion had passed away, aged 66, was revealed to the arena. A silence and sadness fell across proceedings, punctuated only by the trill of the ring bell, struck ten times in keeping with boxing’s tradition.

Michael Buffer was clearly emotional in announcing the news to the gathered audience and those of us fighting the call to sleep in the early hours of the morning shared his emotion too.

The fight was thankfully not subdued and served as a pulsating reminder of how greatness, of the type Marvin Hagler represented a luminous example, was once earned.

Continue reading “Estrada edges Gonzales in a pulsating encounter as boxing remembers a fallen great”

Canelo and Jacobs step into the spotlight of future history

Before the advent of the internet, specifically the explosion of available answers to every conceivable question, and the need to finesse the ensuing search results to more manageable quantities, filters, in common parlance, would only be found in conversations about car engines, or perhaps a fish tank sufficiently grand to require a pump. Not the bowling ball sized hell my own goldfish endured for a year or two but one of those with an apologetic piece of plastic seaweed or perhaps an ornamental bridge or lost ship wreck. You know, fancy ones. The type of thing people with a caravan had in their hall, those who drank coffee not tea, used sunflower spread not butter back in the seventies. Holidayed in France. You know the type.

Both applications remain relevant today of course, though you may need a safe cracker, with a sideline as a contortionist to find and replace a filter on a modern combustion engine, even a car has to ask Alexa to diagnose a fault these days. Fish in captivity do still need something to keep the flotsam and jetsam at bay too, not as much as their free swimming cousins a ‘green’ wag might suppose, but I digress. Continue reading “Canelo and Jacobs step into the spotlight of future history”

Audley Harrison. The importance of the man who wouldn’t be King.

Photo: Dave Shopland

Lennox Lewis strode languidly down the aisle. A glow of certainty and phosphorous bulbs surrounding him. Assurance emanated from his tall, imposing frame.  His stillness, the type which led him to sleep in the dressing room before a big fight, serving to amplify the latent power beneath.

Lewis the slumbering lion, on a high rock, stealing shade behind dark glasses and offering verification to proceedings merely by being present.

Continue reading “Audley Harrison. The importance of the man who wouldn’t be King.”

A Muscovite’s view of the Executioner’s song

It doesn’t matter where you sit. It doesn’t matter from where you viewed Saturday’s spectacle, Bernard Hopkins victory over Kelly Pavlik is arguably one of the most complete boxing clinics since, Barrera schooled Naseem Hamed perhaps? Andrew Mullinder captures the major emerging points from the fight in his regular summary from the chilly confines of his Russian residency.
Continue reading “A Muscovite’s view of the Executioner’s song”

Boxing: Usain Bolt, Muhammad Ali and the impossible comparison

The astonishing performances of Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt broke the consciousness of almost the entire population of the world this week. Only the Olympics and perhaps the football World Cup offer such global exposure [alas the heavyweight championship has long lost this broad appeal], and though I doubt he could run backwards as fast as his contemporaries in the Olympic boxing ring, the question of his place amongst the greats of the track is unquestionable. The clock doesn’t lie. Bolt is faster than anyone who ever lived. Such cross generation comparison in boxing, provides no such clarity.

Continue reading “Boxing: Usain Bolt, Muhammad Ali and the impossible comparison”

BoxingWriter.co.uk Tribute Wear

Hatton THatton TBegun on an idle whim, the BoxingWriter .co.uk Tribute Wear has proved tremendously popular and exceeded expectation. Sales of t-shirts featuring the likes of Marciano, Hearns and Tapia have been well received and dispatched to satisfied customers within 2-3 days of order receipt and the feedback on quality has been favourable too. Check them out… Continue reading “BoxingWriter.co.uk Tribute Wear”

Hopkins Returns. Did he ever leave?

When you start to open a door, the pressure has to be greatest in the beginning, yet the door moves the least.

Norman Mailer, Author, 1923-2007, The Executioner’s Song (1979)

Boxing needs personalities. And never more so than in the beleaguered heavyweight division. Yesterday’s announcement, and the worst kept secret in boxing, that former middleweight great and presently consensus Light-Heavyweight champion Bernard Hopkins plans to return in the blue ribbon weight class didn’t cause the gasps of disbelief the ‘Executioner’ appears to crave.

Continue reading “Hopkins Returns. Did he ever leave?”

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